Thursday, August 8, 2013

A Review: Fuller K. LaRouche – The Exemplary Demon Child

To the propagators of referer spam, you will suffer an excruciating ass tickle which lasts the next three popeships. For the rest, a literary review...

      A slight odor of coconut vagina, which is to say, if coconuts had vaginas, or rather, if vaginas had coconuts. A wispy and tell-tale sting of almond oblivion dovetailing into a maelstrom of blueberry ecstasy – a necessary sort of transition, no doubt, so as to not fatigue the palate and confuse the senses.

     I speak, of course, of Fuller K. LaRouche’s latest diatribe in the demonic – a testimonial of his trials and tribulations against tyranny and typhoid fever – his latest magnum opus, the subtly titled Flagellating My Penis.

     LaRouche has truly transcended the art form and redefined the English language. Not content to merely ape societal trifles, his “penis flagellation” is the not the act of sex organ punishment but a profound exploration of words, language, and culture. Our Judeo-Christian bias confirms that any and all flagellation must include corporal punishment, guilt and/or leather, and homo-erotic latencies. However, flagellation can refer to a form of locomotion – and in this piece of neo-realist literary pre-cum exists a sort of existentialist epiphany – his character’s penis has developed quite literal flagellum appendages and extremities.

     LaRouche is the exemplary artistic demon child, and his extensive work has brought much-needed attention to the plight of urban middle to upper class whites struggling with depression, post-college angst and psychological disorders hampering their abilities to form long-lasting meaningful relationships. And yet his prose, at times both harsh and sensitive, speaks to the souls of the downtrodden, the blue collar, and those unfortunate enough to suffer the economic hardship of adjunct American lagers.

     Flagellating My Penis is the new standard of literary shock, and his succinct descriptions of severing his penis flagellum is a metaphor for the manner in which pop culture has severed its meaningful relationship with art. Not content with standard genre vacuities, LaRouche demands that his audience both appreciate and understand themes within themes, and motifs within motifs.